Wednesday, 16 May 2012

Elective Teaching: Reptiles and Other

For my second week of elective teaching I chose to do Reptiles and Other. I figured it would be good to brush up on some of that stuff, seeing as how we don't really get much of it in our core curriculum, and I figured it would be handy to have some knowledge in that department when it comes to selling myself to a future employer! It was an interesting week (I would have made some adjustments to the class schedule), fun, and we had some talks presented to us by some pretty cool people. 

For our first day we got to go to the London Zoo and spent the afternoon 'behind the scenes' at the reptile enclosures. We got to see the reptile vet hospital and then after a chat with one of the keepers, we had the afternoon in the zoo at our leisure!


Burmese Python at the London Zoo


Plumed Basilisk at the London Zoo


Galapagos Tortoise at the London Zoo


The following day we had a reptile handling class where we got to handle some tortoises, several lizard species, and a couple snake species. The next two days we had some guest speakers, one was{Stuart McArthur}, author and vet, who spoke to us about turtle and tortoise medicine and surgery, and the other was Simon Girling, head of Veterinary Services for the {Royal Zoological Society of Scotland}, who spoke to us about squamate medicine and surgery. Overall a very interesting week! 

If I had to choose 3 take home messages from the week, they would be:
1. When stitching up a snake, use an everting suture pattern.
2. When hibernating a turtle, you put them in your fridge.
 3.  Snakes and Lizards do not feel thermal pain, so they will frequently burn themselves.

The Chameleon at our reptile handling practical -- he was my fave!


Bosc Monitor Lizard during our reptile handling practical


8 comments:

  1. i like the pic of the Plumed Basilisk!

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  2. nice!! looks/sounds fun!

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